Trophic ecology, physiology, and ecosystem services in freshwater ecosystems

A part of my research in this area has focused on understanding population level-variation in fish physiology. Understanding the extent and pace over which Intraspecific variation in physiology evolves is crucial to being able to predict the pace of evolution and population persistence in the populations that are often isolated. An extension of my interest in this area is in quantifying the contribution of rapid evolution to ecosystem services in freshwater ecosystems. From local adaptation in salmonids to rapid evolution of Daphnia that leads to remediation of algal blooms there is a wealth of suggestive evidence of the benefits that we derive from rapid evolution. These ‘evosystem services’ present an avenue to manage ecosystems to ensure ecosystem services are maintained for future generations.

Seth Rudman
Seth Rudman
Assistant Professor

The Rudman lab at WSU-Vancouver uses experiments and genomic tools to answer questions about the ecological and evolutionary fates of populations inhabiting rapidly changing environments.