Trophic ecology, physiology, and ecosystem services in freshwater ecosystems

Having grown up in the great lakes region I am motivated to understand the rapid evolution, ecology, and physiology of freshwater organisms. I mainly work in lakes, where populations are often discrete and eco-evolutionary processes occur in parallel in multiple locations within a landscape.

A part of my research in this area has focused on understanding population level-variation in fitness-associated phenotypes. Understanding the mechanisms that drive intraspecific variation, the pace over which it evolves, and it’s effects on populations, communities, and ecosystem functions is crucial to being able to predict and protect freshwater ecosystems.

An extension of my interest in this area is in quantifying the contribution of rapid evolution to ecosystem services in freshwater ecosystems.From local adaptation in salmonids to rapid evolution of Daphnia that leads to remediation of algal blooms there is a wealth of suggestive evidence of the benefits that we derive from rapid evolution. These ‘evosystem services’ present an avenue to manage ecosystems to ensure ecosystem services are maintained for future generations.

Publications

. Evosystem Services: Rapid Evolution and the Provision of Ecosystem Services. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 2017.

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. It is about time: genetic variation in the timing of leaf‐litter inputs influences aquatic ecosystems. Freshwater Biology, 2016.

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. Investment in boney defensive traits alters organismal stoichiometry and excretion in fish. Oecologia, 2016.

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. Piscivore addition causes a trophic cascade within and across ecosystem boundaries. Oikos, 2016.

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. Responses to simulated winter conditions differ between threespine stickleback ecotypes. Molecular Ecology, 2016.

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